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Walmart to Fund College Degrees for Employees

Walmart to Fund College Degrees for Employees

Walmart is offering to pay for employees’ college tuition, books and fees if they pursue degrees in business or supply chain management, according to the company.

“Investing in the personal and professional success of our associates is vital to Walmart’s future success,” Greg Foran, CEO of Walmart U.S., says. “We know training and learning opportunities empower associates to deliver for customers while growing and advancing in their careers.”

To offer the education benefits for employees, the big-box retailer is working with the University of Florida, Brandman University and Bellevue University, which offer both online and on-campus classes.

The colleges are “nonprofit schools selected for their focus and strong outcomes on serving working adult learners,” according to a statement from the retailer.

Walmart announced the new education program May 30, explaining that the tuition program is part of the company’s pursuit of helping develop its workforce professionally.

The education program requires students to pay $1 per day, with Walmart covering the rest of tuition and related costs, “eliminating the need for student loan debt and addressing one the biggest hurdles that keep people from returning to college,” the company says.

Walmart U.S. and Sam’s Club employees are eligible for the academic programs.

The retailer is also paying for academic coaching to keep students on track in their programs, and is also fully funding the cost of employees to earn GEDs or high school diplomas, according to the company.

About Kate Klein

Kate Klein
Kate is an assistant editor for Hardware Retailing magazine. She reports on news and industry events. She graduated from Cedarville University in her home state of Ohio, where she earned a bachelor's degree in English and minored in creative writing. She loves being an aunt, teaching writing to kids, running, reading long books, farm living and, as Walt Whitman says, traveling the open road, “healthy, free, the world before me.”